Writing Homework #15 — Studying Pacing

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Pacing in writing can be a tricky beast to wrangle. It’s often hard to know how your story flows by the end of the first draft, and even if you do, there’s probably a lot about the pacing that needs work. A solid rhythm might not even take shape until multiple rewrites are done.

And it’s a difficult thing to sum up in a quick homework assignment, but I’ve got an idea.

Pick a book from your shelf that has never bored you. It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite book ever, or one you know by heart, but it does have to be one you’re reasonably familiar with, and most importantly, IT’S NEVER BORING.

Pick a chapter from the middle. Not the end, where it’s likely to be more action (for most genres, anyway) or the beginning, where it’s likely to lean into world- or character-building. Pick a chapter from the part of a story that so often sags, the part that gives so many writers, myself included, terrible fits of frustration–the middle.

Reread it. While you are, make notes about any obvious hooks–bits of foreshadowing for the end, payoffs of earlier foreshadowing, subplot resolutions or new subplot introductions, new characters, new settings. Depending on the exact chapter of the exact book, not all of these will be present–but if the middle’s not boring, something is happening. What? What is happening to keep you so engaged?

If you have the time and inclination, re-reread the same chapter, but break it down page by page. What is most of each page devoted to? Action, conversation, description, exposition? Is there a balance between two or more of them? Does the balance shift as the chapter goes on?

And in your future reading, use these questions to study books that are boring you, to see what it is that’s failing. Too much exposition at once usually an obvious flaw, for example, but it could be something more subtle–are the characters talking, and it should be helping the plot move, but it’s really just filler? Is there too little action, or is there too much, and it whizzes by so fast you don’t feel like you absorbed any of it?

If you study stories with good balance first, ones that keep you engaged, it will be easier to identify flaws both in less intriguing books, and in your own work as you rewrite and edit.


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