Down the TBR Hole #18

Down the TBR Hole is a (very) bookish meme, originally created by Lia @ Lost In A Story. She has since combed through all of her TBR (very impressive) and diminished it by quite a bit, but the meme is still open to others! How to participate:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf
  • Order by Ascending Date Added
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or let it go?

I missed this meme in my schedule last month because of overload, but it’s time to get back on track! With my decreased reading time it’s even more important to weed out anything that doesn’t appeal to me anymore, so let’s get started.

#1 – When Dimple Met Rishi, by Sandhya Menon

28458598YA contemporary romance focusing on non-white characters. We need more of this! I want to support this!

And my friends’ reviews range from “it’s cute, 3 stars” to “best thing since sliced bread, 5 stars.” So, even though my history with YA contemporary romance is mixed, I’m still on board.

It stays.

 

 

#2 – Soundless, by Richelle Mead

24751478Pretty sure this one made the list because pretty cover + Tumblr hype.

Since then I’ve read two of Mead’s adult romance novels, and I wasn’t terribly impressed. Plus I have an unread copy of The Glittering Court on my TBR shelf, picked up for pennies at a library sale.

When the reviews for this book are so scattered across the board, I don’t think I need to go out of my way for it, when I already have one of Mead’s other YA titles to try. It goes.

 

#3 – The Secret Horses of Briar Hill, by Megan Shepherd

28588101I’m not entirely sure where I picked this one up–looking at the Goodreads page, I thought perhaps it was because Maggie Stiefvater gave it a glowing review, but I actually added it a month prior to that. The universe just sent it to me, apparently.

I rarely read middle grade books these days, but this sounds like it’s encapsulated most of my childhood reading memories and turned them into something new for me to enjoy. It can stay.

Thank you, Universe.

#4 – A Life in Parts, by Bryan Cranston

29868612Okay, I’m mostly burnt out on celebrity memoirs after reading far too many from chefs and other foodie personalities that generally left me disappointed.

But, dude. Bryan Cranston. I love Breaking Bad, I never watched Malcolm in the Middle much but whenever I did I laughed my ass off, and in every interview I’ve seen him do in the last few years, he’s been intelligent, well-spoken, and slyly hilarious.

I’ll dip my toes back into the memoir pool for him. It stays.

 

#5 – We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson

6708624A horror classic I haven’t gotten to yet. I generally avoid horror media outside of books, yet find myself reading it frequently, and even if I don’t end up loving this–my track record with “classics” is hit and miss at best–it’s short and I think it will be worth my time.

It stays.

[Man, I’m really not cutting much this month, am I?]

 

 

#6 – Beyond This Dark House, by Guy Gavriel Kay

104090My days of reading poetry for fun seem long past–I read tons in college, when I was also writing my own poems far more frequently.

Now I’m all about that prose, both in writing and reading. My husband has a huge shelf of poetry that I could try, and yet, I never do.

But Kay is one of my all-time favorite authors, so when I found out that he has published poetry as well, I had to add it. I don’t know when I’ll get to it, but I want to. It stays.

 

#7 – The City of Shifting Waters, by Pierre Christin

7810429This classic series of French comics came to my attention with the movie adaptation, so on the TBR it went.

But, for the most part, I’m not a graphic novel reader. I still have eight volumes of Preacher to get through this year, and I want to finish Saga as well. Adding another long series to that particular pile doesn’t appeal to me.

Also, I heard the movie wasn’t that great. I’m just not excited about this anymore. It goes.

 

#8 – Her Secret Lover, by Robin Covington

28054518This came from one of the frequent short lists of romances by authors of color that float around. I always scan them for books that sound interesting and for authors I haven’t tried, because damn, the Romance Industry might be mostly women (yay!) but it’s still very, very white.

For that reason alone, it should stay–I need to broaden my horizons and put my money where my mouth is–but luckily for me, this still sounds as good as when I first found it! I’m always a sucker for romance-author characters.

It stays.

#9 – The Trumpet of the Swan, by E.B. White

24335So, I only recently discovered that the author of my beloved Charlotte’s Web ever wrote anything else–talk about being known for one thing!

Obviously I have to read this, too. Will it be as good? Not sure. Do I care? Absolutely not!

Look at him! A swan with a trumpet! It’s adorable!

I’m 100% keeping this.

 

#10 – Written in Red, by Anne Bishop

15711341Oh, Anne Bishop. I loved The Black Jewels at first, but when I went to reread them years later, I found I’d outgrown them. Ephemera started strong then left me bitterly disappointed–I couldn’t even finish the third book, it was so dull.

Do I risk it again? Do I try your most recent series? Am I ready for that potential heartbreak?

I think I do, I will, and I am–maybe. But only if I get it from the library. I’m not ready to invest more energy than that. It can stay. But I won’t hesitate to forget the series exists if this doesn’t wow me.


I only cut 2/10 this month! What? That doesn’t sound like me.

As always, if you’ve read any of these and have opinions to share, want to change my mind about something, please leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s