This Week, I Read… (2019 #31)

99 - Deadline.jpg

#99 – Deadline, by Mira Grant

  • Read: 7/24/19 – 7/28/19
  • Challenge: Virtual Mount TBR (30/48)
  • Rating: 3/5 stars

I liked it, and I’m going to finish the trilogy, but this was a step down from Feed.

I just don’t care as much for Shaun as I did for George. She was a more compelling narrator, and I got tired of Shaun’s constant need to tell us how crazy he was. Yeah, I get it–but did the narrative really need to remind us, every single time he talked to himself out loud and others could hear him, that they mostly knew he was crazy so it was okay? It’s repetitive, annoyingly so. Once it’s established that he’s delusional, even if just in one relatively straightforward way, can’t we limit the reminders of how the rest of the characters perceive him to the times when they have interesting reactions, instead of letting him do his thing? Only bring it up when it matters!

So that’s my first major gripe. The second being, Kelly the helper/hostage got much the same repetitive treatment. Shaun, as a narrator, had to constantly make sure that we, the reader, knew she was guarded every second of every scene. Can’t we assume that after a while? Can’t it only matter when he wanted to assign people to tasks and realized he didn’t have enough people for them and guarding Kelly, so that he had to make some kind of important choice, either about how to reshuffle things or who to send her with? Routine logistics don’t need to be remarked upon every five pages!

With my stylistic issues out of the way, I can say the plot was mostly fine. Interesting things happen, which occasionally also means horrible things. Stuff we think we know, incontrovertible stuff, is questioned and found lacking. The ending might have included one currently inexplicable miracle-level event. I’m on this train and I want to find out where it goes. I already have the final book borrowed from the library.

I just think Shaun is way less interesting than his sister. I hope the final book finds a way to make him more palatable.

100 - How to Say Goodbye

#100 – How to Say Goodbye, by Amber Lin

  • Read: 7/28/19 – 7/29/19
  • Challenge: Mount TBR (65/100)
  • Rating: 2/5 stars

Okay, it’s New Adult, but it lacks the two major hallmarks of NA romances: a tone of hyperbolic angst or a scene breakdown that skirts the line between a reasonable level of smut and full-fledged erotica. There’s sex scenes, sure, but not every two pages, and not immediately after these characters meet. And there’s angst, yeah, but it’s not for its own sake, it’s actually mostly centered around the dual issues of runaways and homelessness. Which is not something I’ve really seen romances tackle with any seriousness (though of course my exposure is not universal and there are probably other romances out there in this wheelhouse..)

I enjoyed it, but not to the point where I don’t see its flaws, or to the point where I wasn’t uncomfortable with how the delicate subject matter was handled. The simple fact of the matter is: I don’t know how realistic this portrayal is of a teenager running away from an unsafe home environment and living on the streets for four years. The story doesn’t ignore the darker aspects of survival without support, but I question if they’re being romanticized or softened to be palatable to the reader. Like, on the one hand, homelessness is obviously not good for somebody and can entail a whole host of legal and moral issues, but am I projecting how awful I think it is when I read this and think, well, Dane doesn’t actually have it that tough? It’s not ideal but it could be worse? I’m not a fair judge of that, and I don’t know that the author is, either, so I don’t know how much of this serious issue is being prettied up for the romance side of things.

And if the core conflict of the story is undermined by my questionable trust in how it’s presented, that’s an issue.

That being said, I do like our characters. They’re both well-developed, with personality flaws and past issues that make for compelling conflict between them. At the same time, though, the end of the story has them see-sawing constantly between breaking up and being together, and I’m just not on board, personally, for that level of lack of commitment. Having the main couple break up once during a typical-length romance, sure. Having them constantly turning away from each other every few chapters? That got old for me, quick, and the last time they did it didn’t feel like a real ending. Nor did them getting back together for their happy ending feel like it was deserved, like it had the proper dramatic weight. It was just another “up” section of their relationship roller coaster to me, which didn’t leave a positive impression of the book to linger with me.

So I enjoyed some of the book. Mostly the scenes that focused on Amy and Dane interacting directly, because their chemistry is solid and their dynamic is pretty adorable at times. But whenever the plot got serious, I liked it less.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s