This Week, I Read… (2019 #34)

112 - Muse of Nightmares

#112 – Muse of Nightmares, by Laini Taylor

  • Read: 8/14/19 – 8/17/19
  • Challenge: Virtual Mount TBR (35/48)
  • Rating: 4/5 stars

In the first book, a number of oddities and mysteries were set up, leaving me eager for the rest of the story. I can say the conclusion does pretty much answer all of them, but it takes a weird and twisting path to get there.

I feel like this story, despite having clear goals to accomplish, is ultimately less focused than the first book. Nearly everything there was framed around the relationship between Lazlo and Sarai–even before they met, it was clear they were going to meet, and that was the moment we were hurtling toward in the beginning. (For long enough to make you maybe-forget about the very beginning of the book, when Sarai’s death is laid out neatly as a spoiler, but with absolutely no context.) Other characters occasionally had POV scenes or chapters when the plot demanded it, but on the whole, it was the Lazlo and Sarai Show, with each chapter generally sticking to one or the other.

Muse, on the other hand, jumps between characters and story threads constantly, even to the point where in a single scene where many characters are present, there’s extensive head-hopping. I hate head-hopping. I hate having to readjust my perspective to align with a different character with no warning, especially multiple times on a page. And I get it–when the big stuff goes down and you’ve got Minya and Nova and Sarai and Lazlo all in the same place, all thinking/feeling important things that the reader needs to know, head-hopping is the easiest way to get it all on the page.

But it’s kind of a mess to read, and I didn’t enjoy that part of it. It robbed the climax of some of its thrill and emotional impact, when I constantly had to sort out who I was suddenly supposed to be focused on.

The story is still interesting, and I’m still invested in these characters–mostly. I think I never felt as much sympathy for Minya as I was supposed to? The relevation about her and the Ellens felt flat to me. On the other hand, Thyon got way more sympathetic and fascinating and I honestly wish there had been more time spent on his development, though I don’t know where it would have fit. And I’m thoroughly delighted by the direction of Eril-Fane and Azareen’s subplot. So there’s plenty of good to balance out my frustration with the bad. And the bad is a pretty minor bad, all things considered. But this wasn’t the same ecstatic thrill ride I experienced in the first book.

#113 – Once Upon a Coffee and Once Upon a Setup, by Kait Nolan

  • Read: 8/17/19 – 8/18/19
  • Challenge: Mount TBR (72/100)
  • Rating: both 3/5 stars

Pairing these together as short novellas from Nolan’s Wishful romance series, which I decided was time to “finish,” as in cleaning up what I had left on my Kindle, these two and one more full-length novel.

Once Upon a Coffee is cute and charming and an excellent example of Nolan’s easy-to-read narrative style. I fell right into this short story about a blind date mix-up, and I liked the characters enough to wish we were getting a whole novel out of it–the ever-present danger with short stories and novellas, that they’re good enough to make the reader want more.

And there is plenty more to be had in the Wishful series, though I don’t particularly think this is a good entry point, despite that #0.5 label–it’s set in Wishful, sure, but no major characters make an appearance (which is fine, considering the context) but also these characters, to my memory, don’t show up at all in the three Wishful novels I’ve already read.

So it’s cute and charming, but it’s also isolated and left feeling both hopeful and unfinished.

I enjoyed Once Upon a Setup, but I’m left honestly questioning why it’s a novella and not just the first few chapters of book 4, which is going to finish the romance set up here. I checked, and book 4 doesn’t break 200 pages, so why is the story chopped in two? (My gut says “marketing” but I hope not.)

I have some of the same issues with this story-bit that I had with book 3, because I still haven’t watched White Christmas so I still don’t get the references. I’m really hoping that we’re going to stop beating that horse in book 4. Please.

All that being said, I like Myles. I like him a lot. It can be hard to write the funny-charming guy as a romantic lead, because humor is so personal and not everyone is going to respond. But beyond the funniness, he’s a thoughtful, respectful guy. Piper doesn’t get quite as much time put into her personality here, but I mostly remember her from before, so it’s okay that Myles gets more development, especially when he’s the big draw.

I’m starting book 4 next, so let’s hope it pays this off.

114 - Just For This Moment.jpg

#114 – Just For This Moment, by Kait Nolan

  • Read: 8/18/19 – 8/19/19
  • Challenge: Mount TBR (73/100)
  • Rating: 3/5 stars

I wanted to like this early on so much more than I actually did in the end. It’s a much more plausible fake/quickie marriage setup than I’m used to seeing in my romance novels, and I do appreciate a good setup. I’m even on board with the external obstacles thrown in their way, forcing their plan to adapt in ways neither of them anticipated.

It’s the internal conflicts that piss me off. A character misunderstanding something they overheard eavesdropping, whether intentional or not, is just such a lazy way to introduce conflict. I don’t like it in other romance novels where I’ve encountered it, and I don’t like it here. To the book’s credit, the character does get called on it–when Piper goes to Tucker to hide out in her confusion and upset, Tucker insists she talk to Myles about it. Which is something, at least. But it’s still lazy. And having that bundled together with an unexpected pregnancy, another tired trope that isn’t usually handled well, this really was a let down. Again, it’s not quite as bad as it could be–since the marriage was such a rush job, it’s understandable that they wouldn’t have talked about their desire for or timeline regarding kids, and the birth control thing was just an accident–those do happen. But it leads to an epilogue that’s very “a kid fixes everything” in its attitude, because the best thing to happen to a rushed relationship and marriage is adding a kid to the mix? No, no, I don’t buy it.

So the first 60% of the book, leading up to the wedding itself and events immediately following it, is fantastic, the exact fun and “madcap” romantic romp the blurb promises. That part of the book is five stars. Then the remaining 40% is a mess and a downer–I accept that there are consequences to rushing a marriage like that, even with someone you think you can make it successful with, but it’s just smashed together out of lazy tropes and ends happily with very little reason to.

115 - Saga, Vol. 8.jpg

#115 – Saga, Vol. 8, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

  • Read: 8/20/19 – 8/21/19
  • Challenge: Virtual Mount TBR (36/48)
  • Rating: 4/5 stars

It’s not that I don’t still love this series, because I do, but something about this volume felt off to me, and I didn’t love it as much as most of the earlier volumes. Something about the pacing made this read so fast, it didn’t have as much impact, or I didn’t feel as satisfied at the end.

Still, it’s full of the fun twists we’ve all come to expect in theory without necessarily being able to predict in practice. I did see Petrichor and the Robot Prince getting together, but only a few pages before it actually happened, so it’s not like the pieces weren’t there for me to put together. Ghus is still amazing and I love him. When Squire called Hazel his “fair maiden” I was like, “oh no tell me that’s not where this is headed” but she (as narrator) immediately refers to him as her brother, so good, that’s not where we’re headed. And given the brotherly-love feeling of most of this volume, I look forward to seeing that plot line in the future.

But there’s not much future left at this point–how could the story possibly end? Maybe that’s where some of my dissatisfaction with this particular volume is coming from, I can’t picture an ending coming from this. The most basic story trajectory has always been obvious and firmly in place–it’s Hazel’s story, from conception and birth through childhood, at least, so far. But when will it end? With only one volume left, at the pace we’re going, she’s not going to die peacefully of old age. I don’t even know that we’re going to see her as an adult, and I sure hope we’re not going to see her kick the bucket as a kid, or at all, really. But I have no basis for predicting how far the story still has to go, even with most of it done. That unmoored feeling of being unable to form expectations about a story never sits well with me, though Saga has been fun, interesting, and inventive enough to distract me from it this whole time. In this volume, perhaps, maybe it didn’t accomplish that as well, and that’s what’s left the faint irritation in my brain that says I should have liked it better.

116 - Saga, Vol. 9

#116 – Saga, Vol. 9, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

  • Read: 8/21/19 – 8/22/19
  • Challenge: Virtual Mount TBR (37/48)
  • Rating: 4/5 stars

I was under the mistaken impression that this was the end, until I came to Goodreads to be all like WTF JUST HAPPENED and I saw people talking about the hiatus. I was incorrect, but I have to say, reading this volume under the mistaken impression that it’s the final one definitely left me disappointed.

Treating it as the cliffhanger it’s intended to be, instead, I like it better. Unsurprisingly.

So a lot of things happen, as usual, and a lot of them are still unexpected, because this story has a consistent track record of putting together plot twists that make perfect sense in hindsight while being nearly impossible to predict. Lots of characters die in this volume–lots of named, important characters, that is, because the earlier volumes are also filled with character deaths. But this had a far greater impact. (Which was part of me going WTF when I still thought this was the end of the story.)

I’m looking forward to more in the future, but I know I’m going to have to reread everything when the new stuff drops, because there are so many interwoven plot threads, and while there are definitely events I will never forget, there are going to be plenty of references to the story that would leave me scratching my head otherwise. Which means dragging my soul through this meat-grinder of a cliffhanger again, something I can say I’m looking forward to as much.

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