Down the TBR Hole #26

Down the TBR Hole is a (very) bookish meme, originally created by Lia @ Lost In A Story. She has since combed through all of her TBR (very impressive) and diminished it by quite a bit, but the meme is still open to others! How to participate:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf
  • Order by Ascending Date Added
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide:keep it or let it go?

New year, same meme!

#1 – Riddley Walker, by Russell Hoban

776573A post-apocalyptic story that is also a linguistic puzzler. Don’t remember where I stumbled across this title, definitely see why I added it.  As to whether it should stay? I may never write another post-apocalyptic work myself, or I may, who knows at this point. But I didn’t lose interest in the genre. I’m interested enough that it can stick around.

 

 

 

#2 – What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, by Haruki Murakami

2195464._SY475_One of the top-rated reviews on Goodreads, under “who do you recommend this for?” says “runners and writers.” I am not a serious runner, a marathon runner, but I am both of these things. I have a piece of Murakami fiction on the shelves already–Norwegian Wood–and ordinarily I’d do the thing where I say “if I hate that then I’ll come back and cut this” but fiction and nonfiction are different beasts, even from the same author, and I’ll probably still want to read this even if I don’t end up liking Norwegian Wood. It stays.

 

 

#3 – Chemistry, by Weike Wang

31684925._SY475_I heard a lot about this leading up to its release and just after, then it sort of disappeared from my radar. I’m pleased to rediscover it, because a) it still sounds awesome, and b) I need “a book with a protagonist in their 20s” for the PopSugar challenge this year and that spot on my list was still blank, waiting for me to read a book on a whim and find out it qualified. But now, I’ve got a plan! It stays and goes on the challenge list.

 

 

#4 – The Golem and the Jinni, by Helene Wecker

15819028Wooo boy, I do not remember putting this on the TBR. Rereading the blurb makes it sound okay, but just okay. Skimming my friends’ reviews section on the Goodreads page leads me to believe this is a love-it-or-hate-it book, because the downside seems to be an incredibly slow pace to the story, but the upside of that is “lush, evocative prose.” I’m not going to invest the kind of time that kind of book needs on a blurb I think is so-so. This definitely goes.

 

 

#5 – Persuading Prudence, by Liz Cole

11329359What exactly the heck? I reread this blurb and have no memory of finding this book or putting it on my list or any reason why I might have done so. If you’d asked me about this title before I did this meme, I would have said, in all honesty, “Never heard of it.” Doesn’t seem like my thing at all, away it goes.

 

 

 

#6 – 8  — The NOLA Nights series, by Thea de Salle

These are on the list because a Tumblr mutual, back when book 2 of the series was released, was hyping it to the stars like it was her own personal mission to make as many people as possible aware of this book and hopefully get them to read it. I was convinced enough to throw the whole series on there, but let’s reexamine that, shall we? Book one has lovers with a pretty large age gap, older male/younger female, and that can be a turn-off for me, but reviews point out that she’s plus-size and he’s bisexual. Bisexual male lead? I can forgive a lot of other things that might make me hesitant if that’s good, because bisexuality as a whole doesn’t have good rep, but within that bi ladies are far more visible than bi guys. So I’m on board so far. Book two, the one that was shoved under my nose so vocally, also has bi rep apparently, and basically everyone who reviewed it thinks it’s even better than the first (which is probably why it was the first one to come to my attention despite being the second in the series.) Still on board. Book three? It looks like there’s some religion/sex tension, which can be disastrous if done wrong, but by then if I’ve read the first two I’ll either like the author’s style or I won’t, and I can decide then to go on or not. The final assessment: they can all stay, and now I’m interested enough to put them at the top of my list when I break my book buying ban in the spring.

#9 – ‘Salem’s Lot, by Stephen King

11590My dedication to pruning my TBR even extends to Mr. King, who is simultaneously one of my favorite authors (his best books are easily a few of my lifetime favorites) and one of the least consistent authors I’ve ever read. When he’s good, he’s great, but when he’s bad, I hate it. (I’m looking at you, Lisey’s Story.) So while I will pick up any King novel I don’t already own at a book sale, no question, I will also DNF that sucker in a heartbeat if I’m not enjoying myself–it’s happened, more than once. I couldn’t get through It, which nearly everyone else loves! So the story behind putting this one on my list is that I did it after some of its character show up late in the Dark Tower series, and they’re pivotal, and I was curious. But now, given how long it’s been since I finished the series (that was my big 2017 series goal) and how disappointed I was with it in the end, my nostalgia for something I haven’t actually read is not good enough. Would I read this book on its own merits? Stephen King does vampires. Old-school, early-career horror. So, so many people claiming in their reviews that it’s their favorite King novel (or at least one of them.) I think this can stay. It won’t be high on my priority list any time soon (I’m currently reading a King story collection and have three more of his novels that I do own slated for challenges this year) but it doesn’t need to be cut. I’m quite likely never going to catch up entirely on King’s back catalog, but that doesn’t mean I can’t try.

#10 – Everything Leads to You, by Nina LaCour

#11 – We Are Okay, by Nina LaCour

#12 – Every Day, by David Levithan

Two bonus books, because I need to do these three together, since they all come from the same source: these are the two authors who wrote one of my favorite books of 2017, You Know Me Well. I’m still recommending it as queer fiction to this day–I was just talking recs with a friend this past weekend and I threw this one at her. And I was lamenting my lack of wlw reading, because there isn’t as much out there as I want there to be, but I haven’t even read some of the big titles of what there is, and LaCour is the author who comes up again and again. Seriously, I loved that book so much, so I went straight to Goodreads to look up the authors’ other work and throw a few on there. They all stay. Looking back at what I chose I think I’m more excited about the LaCour books than the Levithan one, but that still looks interesting for its unusual premise.


Once again, it was a bumper crop of books that did not get cut. I only pitched 2/12 this time (like last month, unlike me) but if I was always cutting more than half my list, then what was I thinking putting them on there in the first place? As always, if you’ve got an opinion to share or a disagreement to voice about any of these books, drop a note in the comments and say why you think I should change my mind!

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